EAC2010 Program

EAC 2010 second level nav - home.EAC 2010 second level nav - program2010 sec ond level nav - call for papers2010 second level nav - vendor showcase2010 second level nav -  registration & accommodation

E-portfolios Australia Conference 2010 logo

Widening participation – engaging the learner

Conference Times

Wednesday 3 November 2010 – 8.15 am to 4.30 pm

Wednesday 3 November 2010 – 4.30 pm to 8.00 pm (Vendor ePortfolios Showcase)

Thursday 4 November 2010  – 8.30 am to 4.45 pm

Program and Book of Abstract Papers

  • For the full two day program click here.
  • For the Book of Abstracts and Papers (Feb 2011) click here.

Online access to EAC2010 Resources

Keynote and plenary presenter recordings:

The following Keynote and plenary speakers were recorded via Elluminate.  To view and listen to these presentations click on the links provided.

Wednesday 3 November (Australia Eastern Daylight Savings Times):

  • 9.30 am – Opening Key note:  Bret Eynon, La Guardia Community College – Making Connections:  ePortfolio as a Resource for Learning, Assessment & Institutional Change.
  • 10.20 am Opening Day Plenary:  Ruth Wallace, Charles Darwin University – The enacted learner identities framework: The potential to improve eportfolios’ use in vocational education – unfortunately  Ruth Wallace was unable to do this presentation due to illness and was replaced by Prof Beverley Oliver, Curtin University of Technology – Engaging e-portfolios for graduate employability: Assurance of learning of capable graduates.
  • Bret Eynon and Beveley Oliver’s presentations are via the same Elluminate recording:  Please click here.
  • 3.20 pm Opening Day Closing Speaker:  Victor Callan, The University of Queensland – Driving e-learning, e-assessment and e-portfolio innovations in the higher education and vocational education and training sectors: Challenges and solutions. Please click here.

Thursday 4 November (Australia Eastern Daylight Savings Times):

  • 9.50 am Day Two Opening Speaker:  Christine Cowper, Information Integrity Solutions – Safe to Store – Safe to Share: ‘Who’s responsible for privacy in an e-portfolio’. Please click here.
  • 3.45 pm Day Two Closing Speaker:  Marcia Devlin, Deakin University – Widening participation and facilitating success: Policy and practice change in Australian higher education. Please click here.

To listen to the presentations:

You must have access to headphones and have installed and configured the web conferencing software. To download Elluminate and to configure your computer click here and follow the instructions.

Powerpoints and other resources

Presenter powerpoints which are available are at http://www.slidesare.net/eportfoliosaustralia.

Other presenter resources and recordings will be available shortly.


Keynote and plenary speakers

Image of Bret Eynon.Opening Key note:  Bret Eynon, La Guardia Community College

Making Connections:  ePortfolio as a Resource for Learning, Assessment & Institutional Change

Linking innovative pedagogy with digital technology and new thinking about assessment, NYC’s La Guardia Community College has built an extensive and successful ePortfolio project. Each year, led by academic faculty, more than 9,000 high risk students enhance their learning with ePortfolios, making LaGuardia an international leader in ePortfolio pedagogy and practice. Building on this data-demonstrated success, La Guardia has launched the Making Connections National Resource Center, currently working with more than 30 US campuses, guiding them as they plan and implement advanced ePortfolio projects.  Drawing on this broad experience, Dr Eynon will review lessons learned from La Guardia and other campuses and discuss strategies for advancing broad integration of ePortfolio in higher education.


Image of Ruth Wallace.Opening Day Plenary:  Ruth Wallace Charles Darwin University

The enacted learner identities framework: The potential to improve eportfolios’ use in vocational education.

Learning is a social process, informed by social interactions that are informed by place, time, language, culture and context. Learner identities are socially informed and connected to learners’ communities based in school, peer, family, local and global contexts. Learner identity has been shown to have an impact on the ways disenfranchised learners engage with formal education. A recent study identified and typified participant learner identities in order to provide a framework for describing learner identities by adapting educational institutions and experiences to support the development of empowered learner identities. The four broad groupings of learner identity are described as resistant, persistent, transitional and enacted. This paper reports on this research and the potential of the learner identity framework to evaluate and refine learning approaches. Finally, the paper discusses each learner profile identified in the study to understand and respond to the decisions of learners around engagement and disengagement and suggests the implications for eportfolio implementation and vocational educational policy.


Image of Victor Callan.Opening Day Closing Speaker:  Victor Callan The University of Queensland

Driving e-learning, e-assessment and e-portfolio innovations in the higher education and vocational education and training sectors: Challenges and solutions.

The growth in our knowledge economy, the changing nature of learning and the changing needs of the learner are among several factors that are driving the growth in technologically enabled learning (e-learning) and assessment (e-assessment) in both the higher education and the vocational education and training sectors. Well-designed e-learning and e-assessments provide numerous advantages for learners, teachers/lecturers, employers and organisations. In particular good learner centred e-assessments in the form of on-line tests, wikis and blogs are being used to aid self assessment, reflective thinking, peer and collaborative assessment. E-assessment can be incorporated into an e-portfolio to provide a purposeful aggregation of digital items which displays for various audiences (the learner, their teacher, their potential employer) evidence of a student’s learning and abilities.


Image of Christine CowperDay Two Opening Speaker:  Christine Cowper Information Integrity Solutions

Safe to Store – Safe to Share: ‘Who’s responsible for privacy in an e-portfolio’

Privacy may be a bit of a sleeper issue in e-portfolios.  E-portfolios contain significant amounts of personal information about learners, some of which may be quite sensitive and which, if not managed well, can compromise learner privacy.  Recent controversies in the online world where big players Facebook and Google have transgressed against privacy expectations highlight what surveys and research show: even for the X, Y and I generations, privacy is important.  But what are the issues for e-portfolio and who is responsible.  Drawing on the work undertaken in developing VET E-portfolio Draft Privacy Guidelines, this presentation will explore:

  • e-portfolio privacy risks, roles and responsibilities of the players including software developers, institutions and learners
  • whether privacy is just a legal compliance issue and
  • how privacy protections can be ‘designed’ in.

Image of Marcia DevlinDay Two Closing Speaker:  Marcia Devlin Deakin University

Widening participation and facilitating success: Policy and practice change in Australian higher education.

The federal government has set ambitious targets for the higher education sector in terms of expansion and greater inclusion of ‘non-traditional’ students in university education. The future growth of the number and proportion of non-traditional students in Australian universities will focus attention keenly on both participation and success. Having enrolled students, universities have a responsibility to contribute to facilitating their success. Drawing on theory and research, this presentation will explore some of the experiences and perspectives of ‘non-traditional’ students and propose some of the changes to institutional policy and practice that will be necessary to advance this agenda in Australia.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s